AdvantEdge Joy@Work Podcast:
AdvantEdge Joy@Work Podcast:

Episode · 6 years ago

LA 028: How Your Mindset Hinders or Liberates Your Success (and How to Change it Today)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Carol Dweck’s excellent book on Mindset shows us that there are two dominant mindsets that people choose to believe of themselves and about learning and growth. Anyone, who is involved in any learning and growth, will recognise these two mindsets. The diagram here represents the two types of mindsets, and I’ll sure you’ll recognise the attitudes of many people you know. Download the Learning to Learn Workbook here Growth Mindset Let’s first take a look at the Growth Mindset: Individuals who hold the Growth Mindset believe that intelligence can be and is developed that the brain is like a muscle that can be trained. With this belief is the desire to improve. To improve, firstly you embrace challenges, because you know that overcoming challenges makes you stronger. No matter what you decide to do, there will be obstacles. For the growth mindset believer, external setbacks do not discourage you. Your self-esteem and self-image are not tied to how you look to others or your success. You see failure as the best opportunity to learn. Thus, either way, you win. You don't see the effort as something useless to be avoided but as necessary to grow and master useful skills. No-one truly enjoys criticism or negative feedback, but the Growth Mindset individual integrates feedback that has genuine worth as an opportunity to change and learn. Negative feedback is not seen as a personal attack, but for what it is; feedback. The success of others is seen as a source of inspiration and information. To Growth Mindset individuals, success is not seen as a zero-sum game. Growth Mindset individuals will improve because of this, and this creates positive feedback loops that encourage them to keep learning, growing and improving. Fixed Mindset Let’s have a look at the Fixed Mindset side: Those, who hold these beliefs, think “they are the way they are”. This doesn't mean that they have any less desire for a positive self-image than anyone else, and they do want to perform well and look smart. But, to achieve these goals... Challenge is hard, and success is not assured, so rather than risk failing and negatively impacting their self-image, they will often avoid challenges and stick to what they know they can do well. Obstacles face everyone but the difference with the Fixed Mindset individual is that obstacles are seen as external forces that get in the way and are either avoided (leading to sub-optimal results and usually, blaming others) or are the 'excuse' for giving up. When effort is required, and your view is that effort is unpleasant and rarely pays dividends... what's the point in exerting that effort? The smart thing, to do then, is avoid as much effort as possible. Negative feedback tends to be ignored because the Fixed Mindset leads you to believe that any criticism of your capabilities is criticism of you. This is discouraging to the people who are giving you feedback and after a while, they stop giving any negative feedback, further isolating the person from external influences that could generate some change. Other's success is used as a benchmark to beat yourself with. Success, in this worldview, is put down to luck or unprincipled actions. Some will go further and deride another person's success finding juicy gossip to attach to them when their success is being lauded by anyone else.   The result is that they don't reach their full potential, and their beliefs feed on themselves: They don't change or improve much with time, if at all, and so to them this confirms “they are as they are”. Download the Learning to Learn Workbook here

Hi. What's better? Today you're listening to the leadership advantage podcast with me, Dr John Campwell, brought to your cels Incom it's why some leaders thrive and others struggle. Now let's look at mindset. Carol dwex excellent book on Mindset shows us that there are two dominant mindsets that people choose to believe of themselves and about learning and growth. Anyone who is involved in any learning and growth will recognize these two mindsets. The diagram here represents the two types of mindsets and I'm sure you're recognize the attitudes of many people. You know. Do you believe that your mind can be trained and developed like a muscle? If you answer yes to growth, excellent. If you answer to know and you believe that you are the way you are, you can't really change and your personality is something fixed, well, you have a more difficulties to overcome. Now consider how you typically face a challenge, something that is well outside of your comfort that do you embrace that challenge? Yes, terrific, doubting...

...yourself or thinking that sometimes, yes, sometimes, in an you may be avoiding challenges. How about obstacles, in when something or some one gets in the way of you achieving your goal. Normally, how do you respond? Do you persist until you get over the obstacle? Yes, fantastic, you are going to love your success, Jurney, or did you think not really. Sometimes I possist if it's important enough, but other times I'll give up, will find another way. Okay. So how do you feel about the effort you have to put in to achieve your goals? Do you see it as an opportunity to develop mastery? O, great, you are already on your way to success. Or did you answer? Well, he depends, or if it's not too much effort or anything similar. So what happens if I criticize you? Do you see this as an opportunity to learn and improve? Brilliant, no worries, you get plenty. Perhaps you've questioned what's or criticism, positive or negative? Okay, what if the criticism is negative? By useful? How do you feel when other people are highly successful, especially in your field? They have achieved what you want to achieve. Do you...

...feel inspired to learn from them, or feel a little threatened by those success maybe even a little resentful and put it down to luck? If you've answered affirmatively, to the latter. You have some work to do on your mind set now. If you're thinking was entirely on the growth mindset side, I believe that you will have fewer issues with forging success if you were more inclined to the fixed mindset side or, put caveats, on the positive side. That's okay too. You're just need to pay a little closer attention and may need to work a little harder on some of the exercises rather than the embedded thinking in your brain. As you may have realized, people with a fixed mindset tend towards the survival cycle and people with a gross mindset tend towards the creative psychle. Neither is right or wrong, and the two mindsets exist simultaneously. There are going to be times when you are firmly in growth mind set, in the creative cycle and causing your life to happen. At other times you may find your use off a little more fixed mind set, in a survival cycle and at the effect of the world and other people. We all...

...live in a fallen world filled with some rather strange indeed. It could be your boss causing you'd feel that way, but here's a little tip if you're thinking this, your boss isn't going to change for you. Only you can change for you. What you have developed over your life is a bunch of automated routines. We call them habits. These are responses to situations that you automatically run without thinking. One of the most concrete examples of habit creation is driving the vehicle when you first learned how to drive, and my apologies if you've never done this or you have only just started driving. For you, imagine the first computer game you play. Your first ever driving lesson was a nightmare. You had to learn how to start the car, turn the wheel, press the accelerator, change the gear, let off the handbrake, use the indicator, look in the mirrors, steer the car, check the mirror, generally press the accelerator whilst turning, whilst letting go of the break, whilst and then some idiot on the Horn and swerved past you as you would gently easing onto the road, screeches, lurches, stalling and a white faced...

...instructor beside you in deepest prayer. By the time you took your test and past it, you're driving was still rather stiff and I'm sure you had to keep remembering and deliberately thinking what to do next, then next, then next, and so on. Driving a car is a very complex business, but you learned it. So yesterday when you drove home. How much thinking about driving did you actually do? Not a lot, is my guest spends how long you've been doing this and if the journey was familiar. But anyone who's been driving a familiar road for a while will tell you that there are times you get to your destination and you're not even sure how you got there or what happened on the road whilst you were out. It was all automatic. It required very little effort from your thinking or conscious brain. That's happen. The routines for driving are remembered by the Basil Ganglia in your brain. Once firmly established thinking, which is done in the neo cortex, he's not required for routine tasks. It's a good job, otherwise you'd have have to think...

...about walking, breathing, digesting your food, keeping your heart pumping and a zillion other things you do every day without thought. Well, do you have habitual responses to obstacles and challenges, responses that have worked for you mostly in the past, and these are your default or habitual responses. They will kick in without thought intervention by you. You will find yourself responding before you realize consciously that you've already responded. A habit has four components. There is a cue, for example, you're driving. Habit may be cued by the turning of the key in the ignition or it may be opening the car door or anything else for you. Once qued, your Basil Ganglia takes over the running of the routine. This saved an enormous amount of energy. Thinking about driving every time would be exhausting. The second component is the routine. Whatever you routinely do without thinking, you just do it. If I asked you how, you'd have to stop and think awhile and take yourself through the routine slowly to be able to relate what it is you do. Thirdly, you get...

...a reward from doing the routine. In driving, you get to your destination. The fourth component only becomes a significant tissue when you want to deliberately cause this habit to be a regular routine. It is craving. It's probably easier to relate this aspect with a different example. I love eating chocolate. I see a bar of chocolate in my fridge, I could just pick it up, eat it and feel the rush of dopamine and Serotonin. If I go without chocolate for a few days, there comes a moment when I crave some chocolate, so I go to the fridge to find my que. A few years ago I try to rid myself of my chocolate eating habit. It is fattening, after all, so I remove the queue. I stopped having any chocolate in my fridge. No Que, no chocolate eating habit. Only the craving didn't start. So I would go to the shop, get chocolate, eat it and then kick myself for my weakness. Removing the queue does not get rid of the craving. Ask anyone who's try to quit smoking. The trick to sustainable changing of her habit according to Charles Duhick, who wrote the...

...power of habit is to keep the same queue and the same reward, change the unwanted routine. So I keep chocolate in my fridge currently. I have a lot of very nice, good ever chocolate in there right now and I've taught myself to see it and routinely pour a glass of water, drink the water and feel the same reward of opening and Serotonin. It's some pride and joy that I am behaving. Same Chemicals, same result in my brain. So you never re chocolates now, not at all. I do when I deliberately choose to do so, not out of a routine habit and unwittingly. Now you will know that I did not say that this is easy, but with deliberately chosen and thought processing, you too can change habits, and indeed we use the same principles to create new habits. The habit of reviewing your goals, for example, or que will queue you to do so. What will be the reward? Then? You stick at it deliberately. For how long, I you ask? As long as it takes the day. You don't have to think about your new routine, but just do it. It's already happy. Some will tell you it takes forty two days, which seems...

...to be a common magic number for this. Certainly, I think it varies and depends on both the person and the entrenchment of any pre existing routine. The longer you've been doing something, the wider, quite literally, the neurons that connect the discreete elements of your habit. Think of it as an expressway was new habits, formation and all that's like slashing your way through a jungle with a machette. Eventually that new party you create will become wider and easier and eventually becomes the default choice. Why not just make a rule and Abay it? That's the carrot and stick approach. Do Go to get good, do bad, get beat? The moment that you put yourself under the law, you fall from grace. You are not choosing but obeying. Brain doesn't like to obey rules. We have free choice and we want to exercise it, albeit within the realms of our own values. Some people respond better to having to do something, others respond better to choosing to do something. I personally infirmly a choice person, but many of my clients like to have rules. If you find yourself questioning or rebelling against imposed I would suspect that you might me or a or a four steps to deliberately changing your mindset and examining...

...any habitual respons as you have. This works especially well with procrastination nother way and works very well with fear of looking foolish, among several other irrational fears for people making a personal breakthrough. Step one is to learn to hear your fixed mindset voice. Maybe I don't have the ability. Are you sure you can do it? What if I fail? I'll be a failure. People will laugh at me for thinking I had talent. If I don't try, I can protect myself and keep my dignity. Have you heard your inner voice with these or similar statements? Learn to hear your inner fixed mindset voice. Obstacles will be there, whatever you decide and whatever you do. When you meet to set back, your inner voice might say, this would have been a snap if I really had the ability. I knew this was whiskey. Now everyone knows how useless I am. If I back out now and make excuses, maybe I can regain my dignity. When you criticized, you may hear yourself it's not my fault, it was something or someone else's. Old who delays to tell me, or maybe someone is giving you constructive fever,...

...but you hear you are a great disappointment. I thought that you were clever and talented butter. Now I see that you are what do you say to yourself when faced with an obstacle in your path? Imagine your next action. For one of your top goals is something that makes you fearful. What are you saying to so? Step to, recognize that you have a choice. Realize that how you interpret challenges, setbacks and criticisms is your choice. You can interpret them in a fixed mindset as signs that your fixed talents or abilities are lacking, or you can interpret them in a growth mindset as signs that you need to ramp up your strategies and effort, stretch yourself and expand your abilities. It's up to you. So, as you face challenges, setbacks and criticism, listen to the fixed mindset voice and you are facing resistance or an obstacle as you are trying to get a personal break through. How are you interpreting this as a sign that your talents, skills or abilities are lacking, as signs that you need to ramp up your effort, stretch yourself and expand your abilities? Step three. Talk back to it with a growth mindset...

...voice. How do you respond? Use Your own words in response to the resisting self and speak them out loud, even if that's just muttering under your breath. As you approach to challenge, the fixed mindset says, are you sure you can do it? Maybe you don't have the talent. The growth mindset answers, I'm not sure I can do it now, but I think I can learn to time and effort. The fixed mindset. What if you fail, you'll be a failure. The growth mindset responds. Most successful people had failures along the way. Fixed Mindset says, if you don't try, you can't protect yourself and keep your dignity. Growth Mindset. If I don't try, I automatic that can fail, with the dignity in that. As you're hit by a setback, the fixed mindset might say, this would have been a snap if you really had talent, growth mindset would respond, that's so wrong. Basketball was an easy for Michael Jordan and science was an easy for Thomas Edison. They had a passion and put in tons of effort. As you face criticism, the fixed mindset goes, it's not my fault,...

...it was something or someone else's fault. The growth mindset responds, if I don't take responsibility, I can't fix it. Let me listen, however painful it is, and learn whatever I can. Then in step for you take the growth mindset action. Over time, which voice you heed becomes pretty much your choice. Whether you take on the challenge wholeheartedly, learn from your setbacks and try again. Hear the criticism and act on it. Now in your hands, practice here in both voices, and practice acting on the growth mind set. See how you can make it work for you. Having completed this exercise, if you were more fixed mindset, you have overcome your first challenge. Well done. If, by any chance, you've decided to void this challenge and not fielding the Worksheet, I urge you to go back and do it. It will help. You've been listening to the leadership advantage podcast with me, Dr John Kimworthy, if you'd like to find out more. This is just sells itcom it's why some leaders thrive and others struggle.

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