AdvantEdge Joy@Work Podcast:
AdvantEdge Joy@Work Podcast:

Episode · 6 years ago

LA 027: What's the Source of Your Power?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

I watched a movie recently about a Michelin Star chef, it's called Burnt and the movie is quite good and somewhat realistic, certainly in the way the chefs behave under pressure. It reminded me of my early career in the kitchens and some of the Chef's I had worked with. Superstar Chefs are renowned for screaming vulgarities, throwing tantrums and punishing staff for any wrong-doing, perceived or real. And with sharp knives and live flames around, you learn to quickly obey. As the saying goes, if you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. In my own experience, chefs use coercive power to achieve what they require, with the excuse that any other form of leadership simply takes too long. So what other sources of power can a leader utilise when they want to motivate others and get them to do things that matter? This week I want to help you understand five different sources of power in the workplace and how you can build a more sustainable source of long-term leadership power and gain influence. People follow powerful people Leadership and power are closely linked even though leadership is NOT about power or position. People follow people who are powerful. And because others follow, the person with power leads. [player] You can Download the Report and Template here   But leaders have power for different reasons. Some are powerful because they alone have the ability to hire or fire, others may give you a bonus or a raise. Some are powerful because they can assign you tasks you don't like. Yet, while leaders of this type have formal, official power, their teams are unlikely to be enthusiastic about their approach to leadership, if these are all they rely on. More positively, leaders may have power because they're experts in their fields, or because their team members admire them. People with these types of power don't necessarily have formal leadership roles, but they influence others effectively because of their skills and personal qualities. And when a leadership position opens up, they'll probably be the first to be considered for promotion. Do you recognize these types of power in those around you – or in yourself? And how does power influence the way you work and live your life? Five sources of Power One of the most notable studies on power was conducted by social psychologists John French and Bertram Raven in 1959. They identified five bases of power: Legitimate – Power that comes from the belief that a person has the right to make demands, and expect compliance and obedience from others. Reward – Resulting from one person's ability to compensate another for compliance. Expert – Power that is based on a person's superior skill and knowledge. Referent – The result of a person's perceived attractiveness, worthiness, and right to respect from others. Coercive – Comes from the belief that a person can punish others for noncompliance. When you are aware of these sources of power, you can better understand why you're influenced by someone, and decide whether you want to accept the base of power being used. Recognize your own sources of power. Build your leadership skills by using and developing your own, appropriate sources of power, and for greatest efficacy. The most effective leaders develop and use referent and expert power mainly. To develop your leadership abilities, learn how to build these types of power, so that you can have a positive influence on your colleagues, your team, and your organization. The Five Bases of Power Let's explore French and Raven's bases of power according to these sources. Positional Power Sources Legitimate Power A president, prime minister, or monarch has legitimate power. As does a CEO, a pastor, a policeman or a fire chief. People holding these formal, official positions – or job titles – typically have legitimate power or auhtority. Social hierarchies, cultural norms, and organizational structure all provide the basis for this type of power. But it can be unpredictable and unstable. If yo

Hi. What's better, today you're listening to the leadership advantage podcast with me, Dr John Camwell, brought to you by Cels Incom. It's why some leaders thrive and others struggle. Hey then, welcome. This is John, and this week I'm talking about how I watched a movie recently about Michel installed chef. It's called Burt and the movie is really quite good, somewhat realistic, certainly in the way the chef's behave under pressure, and it reminded me of my early career in the kitchens and some of the chef's I'd worked with. Superstar chefs are renowned for screaming vulgarities, throwing tantrums and punishing staff for any wrongdoing, perceived or real, and with sharp knives and lie claims around, you learn to obey quickly. As the saying goes, if you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. In my own experience, chefs use coercive power to achieve what they require, with the excuse to any other form of leadership simply takes too long. So what other sources of power can a leader utilize when they want to motivate others and get them to do things that matter. This week I want to help you understand five different sources of power in the workplace and how you can build a more sustainable source of long term leadership power and gain influence. Leadership and power are very closely linked and whilst leadership is influence and not power, power and position are not the same thing as leadership, but they are very closely linked and people do tend to follow those who are powerful and because others follow, the person with power...

...leads. But leaders have power for very different reasons. Some are powerful because they alone have the ability to give you a burdness or a raised. They have the power to hire or fire. Others are powerful because they can assign you tasks that you don't like. Yet while leaders of this type have formal or official power, their teams are unlikely to be enthusiastic about their approach to leadership if that's all they rely on. Think about the last boss that you had the only use their positional power and how you didn't sustain your followership as willingly as you would with somebody who use their influence. But on the more positive side, leaders may have power because their experts in their field or because their team members admire them. It is bestowed upon them. People with these types of power don't necessarily have those formal leadership roles, but they influence others effectively because of their skills and their personal qualities and their charisma, and when a leadership position opens up they'll probably be the first to be considered for promotion. Do you consider these types of power in those around you all in yourself, the different ways you exhibit different power, and how does power influence the way you work and the way you live? When we look at understanding power, there's a very notable study on power conducted by social psychologists back in the late nine S. John French and Bertram Braven, I think it was fifty nine, identified five basis of power and it's still relevant today. There is...

...this legitimate power, reward power, expert power, refer and our and coercive power. Legitima power comes from the belief that a person has the right to make those demands and they expect compliance and obedience from others. A policeman would have legitimate power. Reward power this this results from one person's ability to compensate another for compliance and expert power. This is based on the person's superior skill and knowledge. Often it's referred to in qualifications that if you are a qualified person, you automatically become an expert in that field. Refer and power. This is the result of someone's perceived attractiveness, their worthiness and right to respect from others. And lastly, coercive power comes from the beliefs that a person can punish others for noncompliance. If you're aware of these different sources of power, these five sources, legitimate reward, expert, refer and and coersive, you can better understand why you influence by someone or how you influence others and decide where's all not you want to accept the base of power that is being used and we need to be recognizing your own sources of power. Building your leadership skills by using and developing your own sources of power appropriately and for best effect. The most effective leaders use mainly refer and or expert power, and to develop your leadership abilities and agility, learn how to build these types of power be recognized as the expert so that you can have a positive influence on your colleagues, your team, your organization and society. Let's explore these five...

...bases of power using French and ravens basis, just to understand a little better how we can better develop our own power base. So let's start with legitimate power. A president, prime minister, the monarch of the Queen of England has power, but so does a see minister or a fire a chief or a policeman. People holding these formal official positions or their job titles typically have power. Social Hierarchies, the cultural normal and organizational structure all provide the basis for legitimate power. But this type of power can be unpredictable and unstable. If you lose the title or the position, the gitimate power can instantly disappear, since others were influenced by the position, not by you, and also, your scope of power is limited to situations that others believe you have the right to control. If a policeman tells people to stay away from a burning building, that's one thing, but if a fire chief tells you, you probably take more notice. If a fire chief, though, tries to make people stay away from a street fight, people will probably ignore him. Therefore, you rely on the legitimate power when it's only the only way you can influence others and when you're a leader. You need much more than this. In fact, you may not need legitimate power at all. So the second type of how we can look as they called reward him. People in power...

...are often able to give out rewards that raise the promotion desirable assignments, Training Opportunities, coaching and even simple compliments. These are just examples of rewards controlled by people in the power. If others expect that you'll reward them for doing what you want, there's a high probability that they'll do it. The problem, though, with this base of power is that you may not have much control over rewards as you would like or need. Supervisors probably don't actually have complete control over salary increases, and managers often can't control promotions or by themselves, and even the CEO needs permission from the Board of directors for some actions. So when you use up your available rewards or the rewards don't have enough perceived value to others, your power and weakens. And one of the frustrations of using rewards as that they often need to be bigger each time if they'd have the same motivational impact. Just think of your own salary that, in order to be remotivated by a hike in your salary, it needs to be even larger than it was previously, and even then, if the rewards are given frequently, people can become sociated, sociated by the reward such that it loses its effectiveness. And there are many, many studies that show that money alone, in particular salaries, have little real impact on driving productivity. A third type of barren want to talk about now is coercive power. This, as a sort about, is also problematic and can be subject to abuse and, what's more, it can cause unhealthy behavior and huge dissatisfaction in the workplace. Threats and punishment are common tools of coercion, implying or threatening that someone...

...will be fired, demoted, denied privileges or given undesirable assignments. Very often you're just kept out of the loop, you're ignored and people take advantage of that. These are examples of using coercive power. While your position may give you the capability to coerce others, it doesn't automatically mean that you have the will or justification to do so, and as a last resort, you may sometimes need to punish. However, extensive use of coercive power is rarely appropriate in an organizational setting. Clearly, if you rely on these forms of power, legitimate reward and coercive power alone, these will result in a very cold, technocratic, impoverished style of leadership. To be a true leader, you need a much more robust source of power that can be supplied by a title and ability to reward, all that, ability to punish. And this is where I'm going to talk about the personal power sources, expert power and refer and power. Expert Power when you have the knowledge, in the skills that enable you to understand a situation, suggest solutions, use solid judgment and generally help perform others, people will probably listen to you. When you demonstrate expertise, people tend to trust you and respect what you say. As a subject matter expert, your ideas will have more value. anothers will look to you for leadership in that area. What's more, you can take your confidence, decisiveness and reputation from rational thank you, and expand them to other subjects and issues, and this is a good way to build and maintain expert power. It doesn't require positional power, so you can use it to go beyond them,...

...and this is one of the best ways to improve your leadership skills. And then there's referring to power, and this is often referred to as charisma, charm, admiration or appeal. What's very interesting is charisma and chart. These are gifts that are given to you and everybody has them to a greater or lesser extent, and you have a charisma with certain people. Just think of some people you exude your charisma, to others you do not. A typical example would be your girlfriend or boyfriend, if you remember those situations. Some people's were attracted to others were not, and you were still the same person. They see, they still had that charisma, but it appealed to some people and doesn't appeal to others. Refer and power. This comes from one person liking and respecting another and strongly identifying with that person in some way. Celebrities have refer and power, which is why they can influence everything from what people buy to whom they elect office. In a workplace, a person with charm often makes everyone feel good, so he or she tends to have a lot of more influence, but not necessarily with everyone. Refer and to power can be a huge responsibility because you don't necessarily have to do anything to earn it. Therefore, it can be abused quite easily. Someone who is likable but lacks integrity and honesty may rise to power and use their power to hurt an alienate people, as well as gain personal advantage. Relying on refer and power a load is not a good strategy for a leader who wants longevity and respect. But when combined with other sources of power, you can help...

...you attrieve great success, particularly when you combine it with expert so let's think about what we covered it. We looked the five sources of power, three of which tend to be positional power sources. That's legitimate power, your job title, your electing to offers reward power, where you have that ability to give rewards, and coercive power, where you have the power to take rewards away or punish people. But two more powerful, longer term leadership power sources, expert power and refer and power. And anyone is capable holding power and influencing others. You don't need to have an important job title or a big office, but if you recognize the different forms of power, you can avoid being influenced by those who use the less effective types of power and you can focus on developing expert and refer and power for yourself. This will have up you become an influential and positive leader and apply this to your life. Go through each of these power bases and I put them all in the show notes for you to go through this and write down when and how you've used that source of power in the past. I'll put a template in the show notes as well for you to download so that you can just quickly go through this. Ask yourself if you use the power appropriately, consider the expected and unexpected consequences of it and decide what you'll do differently next time. Think about what people who have power and influence over you, what sources of power do they use? To they use their power appropriately where necessary, and develop a strategy...

...to reduce someone else's use of the illegitimate power over you if you need to. When you feel powerless or overly influence, stop and think about what you can do to regain your own power and control. See you're never ever without power. Make an effort to be more aware of the power you have with different people, and you may have all five sources of power with five different people. Make an effort to be aware of that power and how you have it, how you use it to get what you need confidently and effectively, and lot the ways that you might change to have a longer term, more sustainable source of power in terms of expert power or refer and power, or perhaps both. But you've enjoyed this podcast on power and understanding that power and different these five different types. Let's see how you get on. Do drop me a line. If you want to comment on this. You can use the comments on the show notes and please do, please leave a review on itunes or stitcher. It's now we're noil live on tuning as well, and give us a writing and a review always helps other people find this leadership advantage podcast. Be Blessed and have a great week ahead. By Fin out, you've been listening to the leadership advantage podcast with me, Dr John Kenworthy. If you like to find out more, this is selscom. It's why some leaders thrive and others struggled.

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